SUMERIAN COMPOSITION. Gilgameš, Enkidu and the nether world

Gilgameš, Enkidu and the nether world

Version A, from Nibru, Urim, and elsewhere
1.
ud re-a ud su3-ra2 re-a (Cited in OB catalogue from Nibru, at Philadelphia, 0.2.01, line 7, line 20, line 21; OB catalogue in the Louvre, 0.2.02, line 7, line 14, line 15; OB catalogue from Urim (U2), 0.2.04, line 29; OB catalogue from Nibru (N3), 0.2.06, line 6)
2.
ĝi6 re-a ĝi6 ba9-ra2 re-a
3.
mu re-a mu su3-ra2 re-a
4.
ud ul niĝ2-du7-e pa e3-a-ba
5.
ud ul niĝ2-du7-e mi2 zid dug4-ga-a-ba
6.
eš3 kalam-ma-ka ninda šu2-a-ba
7.
imšu-rin-na kalam-ma-ka niĝ2-tab ak-a-ba
8.
an ki-ta ba-da-ba9-ra2-a-ba
9.
ki an-ta ba-da-sur-ra-a-ba
10.
mu nam-lu2-u18-lu ba-an-ĝar-ra-a-ba
11.
ud an-ne2 an ba-an-de6-a-ba
12.
den-lil2-le ki ba-an-de6-a-ba
13.
dereš-ki-gal-la-ra kur-ra saĝ rig7-bi-še3 im-ma-ab-rig7-a-ba
14.
ba-u5-a-ba ba-u5-a-ba
15.
a-a kur-še3 ba-u5-a-ba
16.
den-ki kur-še3 ba-u5-a-ba
17.
lugal-ra tur-tur ba-an-da-ri
18.
den-ki-ra gal-gal ba-an-da-ri
19.
tur-tur-bi na4 šu-kam
20.
gal-gal-bi na4 gi gu4-ud-da-kam
21.
ur2 ĝišma2 tur-re den-ki-ka3-ke4
22.
niĝ2-bun2-na du7-am3 mi-šu2-šu2
23.
lugal-ra a ĝišma2-saĝ-ĝa2-ke4
24.
ur-bar-ra-gin7 teš2 mu-na-gu7-e
25.
den-ki-ra a ĝišma2-eĝer-ra-ke4
26.
ur-maḫ-gin7 saĝ ĝiš im-ra-ra
27.
ud-bi-a ĝiš 1-am3 ĝišḫa-lu-ub2 1-am3 ĝiš 1-am3
28.
gu2 id2buranun-na kug-ga-ka du3-a-bi
29.
id2buranun-na a na8-na8-da-bi
30.
a2 u18-lu ur2-ba mu-ni-in-bur12 pa-ba mu-ni-in-suḫ
31.
id2buranun-na a im-ma-ni-ib-ra
32.
munus-e inim an-na-ta ni2 te-a du
33.
inim den-lil2-la2-ta ni2 te-a du
34.
ĝiš šu-na mu-un-dab5 unugki-še3 ba-ni-in-kur9-re
35.
ĝiškiri6 gi-rin dinana-še3 im-ma-ni-in-ku4-ku4-re
36.
munus-e ĝiš šu-na li-bi2-in-du ĝiri3-ni-ta bi2-in-du
37.
munus-e ĝiš šu-na a li-bi2-in-dug4 ĝiri3-ni-ta bi2-in-dug4
38.
me-na-am3 ĝišgu-za gi-rin ba-ni-tuš-de3-en bi2-in-dug4
39.
me-na-am3 ĝiš-nu2 gi-rin ba-ni-nu2-de3-en bi2-in-dug4
40.
mu 5-am3 /mu\ [10-am3 ba-e-zal-la re]
41.
ĝiš ba-gur4 kuš-bi nu-mu-un-da-dar
42.
ur2-bi-a muš tu6 nu-zu-e gud3 im-ma-ni-ib-us2
43.
pa-bi-a mušen anzudmušen-de3 amar im-ma-ni-ib-ĝar
44.
šab-bi-a ki-sikil lil2-la2-ke4 e2 im-ma-ni-ib-du3
45.
ki-sikil zu2 li9-li9 šag4 ḫul2-ḫul2
46.
kug dinana-ke4 er2 e-ne ba-še8-še8
47.
ud zal-le-da an-ur2 zalag-ge-da
48.
buru5 ud zal-le šeg10 gi4-gi4-da
49.
dutu agrun-ta e3-a-ni
50.
{[nin9]-a-ni kug dinana-ke4} {(1 ms. has instead:) nin9-a-ni ur-saĝ šul dutu-ur2}
51.
{[ur-saĝ šul] dutu-ra} {(1 ms. has instead:) kug dinana-ke4} gu3 mu-na-de2-e
52.
šeš-ĝu10 ud re-a na-aĝ2 ba-tar-ra-a-ba
53.
ud ḫe2-ma-al-la ka-na-aĝ2-ĝa2 ba-e-zal-la re
54.
ud an-ne2 an ba-an-ir-ra-a-ba
55.
dmu-ul-lil2-le ki ba-an-ir-ra-a-ba
56.
dga-ša-an-ki-gal-la-ra kur-ra saĝ rig7-ga-še3 im-ma-ab-rig7-ga-a-ba
57.
ba-u5-a-ba ba-u5-a-ba
58.
a-a kur-še3 ba-u5-a-ba
59.
dam-an-ki kur-še3 ba-u5-a-ba
60.
u3-mu-un-ra tur-tur ba-an-da-ri
61.
dam-an-ki-ra gal-gal ba-an-da-ri
62.
tur-tur-bi na4 šu-a-kam
63.
gal-gal-bi na4 gi gu4-ud-[da-kam]
64.
ur2 ĝišma2 tur-re dam-an-ki-[ka3-ke4]
65.
še-en-bun2-na du7-am3 i3-[šu2-šu2]
66.
u3-mu-un-ra a ĝišma2-saĝ-/ĝa2\-[ke4]
67.
ur-bar-ra-gin7 teš2 mu-un-na-gu7-[e]
68.
dam-an-ki-ra a ĝišma2-eĝer-/ra\-[ke4]
69.
ur-maḫ-gin7 saĝ ĝiš im-ra-ra
70.
ud-bi-a mu di-ta-am3 ĝišḫa-lu-ub2 di-ta ĜIŠ TUG2 di-ta-am3
71.
gu2 id2buranun-na kug-ga-ka du3-a-ba
72.
id2buranun-na a na8-na8-da-bi
73.
a2 tum9u18-lu ur2-ba mu-ni-in-bur12 pa-ba mu-ni-in-suḫ
74.
id2buranun-na a im-ma-ni-ib-ra
75.
nu-nus e-ne-eĝ3 an-na-ta ni2 te-a du
76.
e-ne-eĝ3 dmu-ul-lil2-la2-ta ni2 te-a du
77.
mu šu-ĝa2 mu-un-dab5 unugki-še3 ba-ni-in-kur9
78.
ĝiškiri6 gi-rin kug ga-ša-an-na-še3 im-ma-ni-in-ku4-ku4
79.
nu-nus-ĝen mu šu-ĝa2(source: na) li-bi2-in-du me-ri-ĝu10-ta bi2-in-du
80.
{ dga-[ša-an]-na-ĝen } {(1 ms. has instead:) nu-nus-ĝen } mu šu-ĝa2 a li-bi2-in-de2 me-ri-ĝu10-ta a bi2-du
81.
me-na-am3 ĝišgu-za gi-rin ba-ni-tuš-u3-de3-en bi2-in-dug4
82.
me-na-am3 ĝiš-nu2 gi-rin ba-ni-nu2-de3-en bi2-in-dug4
83.
mu 5-am3 mu 10-am3 ba-e-zal-la re
84.
mu ba-gur4 [kuš]-/bi\ nu-mu-un-da-dar
85.
ur2-bi-[a muš tu6] nu-zu-e gud3 im-ma-ni-ib-us2
86.
pa-bi-a mušen anzudmušen amar im-ma-ni-ib-ĝar
87.
šab-ba-/bi\-a [ki]-sikil lil2-la2-ke4 e2 im-ma-ni-in-us2
88.
ki-sikil /zu2\ [li9]-li9 šag4 ḫul2-ḫul2
89.
kug dinana-ke4 er2 e-ne ba-še8-še8
90.
/šeš\-a-ni ur-saĝ šul dutu inim-bi nu-mu-de3-gub
91.
ud /zal-le\-da an-ur2 zalag-ge-de3
92.
mušen buru5mušen ud zal-le šeg10 gi4-gi4-da
93.
dutu /agrun\-ta e3-a-ni
94.
nin9-a-ni kug dinana-ke4
95.
ur-saĝ dgilgameš2 gu3 mu-na-[de2-e]
96.
šeš-ĝu10 ud re-a na-aĝ2 ba-tar-ra-a-[ba]
97.
ud [ḫe2-ma-al-la] ka-na-aĝ2 ba-e-zal-la re
98.
[ud an-ne2 an] [ba-an]-ir-ra-a-ba
99.
[dmu-ul-lil2-le ki] [ba]-an-ir-ra-a-ba
100.
[dga-ša-an-ki-gal-la-ra] kur-ra saĝ rig7-ga-še3 im-ma-ab-rig7-ga-a-ba
101.
ba-u5-a-ba ba-u5-a-ba
102.
a-a kur-še3 ba-u5-a-ba
103.
dam-an-ki kur-še3 ba-u5-a-ba
104.
u3-mu-un-ra tur-tur ba-an-da-ri
105.
dam-an-ki-ra gal-gal ba-an-da-ri
106.
tur-tur-bi na4 šu-kam
107.
gal-gal-bi na4 gi gu4-ud-da-kam
108.
ur2 ĝišma2 tur-re dam-an-ki-ka3-ke4
109.
še-en-bun2-na du7-am3 i3-šu2-šu2
110.
u3-mu-un-ra a ĝišma2-saĝ-ĝa2-ke4
111.
ur-bar-ra-gin7 teš2 mu-un-na-gu7-e
112.
dam-an-ki-ra a ĝišma2-eĝer-ra-ke4
113.
ur-maḫ-gin7 saĝ ĝiš im-ra-ra
114.
ud-bi-a mu di-ta-am3 ĝišḫa-lu-ub2 di-ta-am3 ĜIŠ TUG2 di-ta-am3
115.
gu2 id2buranun-na kug-ga-ka du3-[a]-ba
116.
id2buranun-na a na8-na8-da-bi
117.
a2 tum9u18-lu ur2-ba mu-ni-in-bur12 pa-ba mu-un-ni-in-suḫ
118.
id2buranun-na a im-ma-ni-ib-ra
119.
nu-nus-e e-ne-eĝ3 an-na-ta ni2 te-a du
120.
e-ne-eĝ3 dmu-ul-lil2-la2-ta ni2 te-a du
121.
mu šu-ĝa2 mu-un-dab5 unugki-še3 ba-an-ni-kur9
122.
ĝiškiri6 gi-rin ga-ša-an-an-na-še3 im-ma-ni-in-ku4–re
123.
nu-nus-e mu šu-na li-bi2-du11 ĝiri3-ni-ta bi2-in-du
124.
d[ga]-ša-an-na-ke4 mu šu-na a li-bi2-de2 ĝiri3-ni-ta bi2-[in]-du
125.
me-na-am3 ĝišgu-za gi-rin ba-ni-tuš-u3-de3-en bi2-in-dug4
126.
me-na-am3 ĝiš-nu2 gi-rin ba-ni-nu2-de3-en bi2-in-dug4
127.
mu 5-am3 mu 10-am3 ba-e-zal-la re
128.
mu ba-gur4 kuš-bi nu-mu-un-da-dar
129.
ur2-bi-a muš tu6 nu-zu-e gud3 im-ma-ni-ib-us2
130.
pa-bi-a mušen anzudmušen-de3 amar-bi im-ma-ni-ib-ĝar
131.
šab-ba-bi-a ki-sikil lil2-la2-ke4 e2 im-ma-ni-in-du3
132.
ki-sikil zu2 li9-li9 šag4 ḫul2-ḫul2
133.
kug {dinana-ke4} {(1 ms. has instead:) dga-ša-an-na-ĝen } er2 e-ne ba-še8-še8
134.
nin9-a-ni inim in-na-an-dug4-ga
135.
šeš-a-ni ur-saĝ dgilgameš2 inim-bi ba-de3-gub
136.
tug2ib2-ba-ru šag4-ba 50 ma-na-am3 ib2-ba-na {ba-an-du3} {(1 ms. has instead:) ba-an-kar}
137.
50-am3 30 giĝ4 ba-ši-in-ak
138.
urudḫa-zi-in-na-ni ḫar-ra-an-na-ka-ni
139.
7 gun2 7 ma-na-ka-ni šu-ni-a ba-an-dab5
140.
ur2-bi-a muš tu6 nu-zu-e saĝ ĝiš ba-an-ra
141.
pa-bi-a mušen anzudmušen-de3 amar-bi šu ba-an-ti ḫur-saĝ-še3 ba-an-kur9
142.
šab-ba-bi-a ki-sikil lil2-la2-ke4 e2 im-ma-an-ni-in-zal
143.
e2-ri-e2-ri-še3 ba-an-kar-kar-re-«eš»
144.
ĝiš ur2-ba mu-ni-in-bur12 pa-ba {mu-ni-in-suḫ} {(1 ms. has instead:) šu bi2-in-kud}
145.
dumu iri-na mu-un-de3-re7-eš-am3
146.
pa-bi i3-ku5-ru-ne {zu2 ba-keše2-re-ne} {(1 ms. has instead:) gu2 bi-ĝar-ĝar-re-eš}
147.
nin9-a-ni kug dinana-ra ĝišgu-za-ni-še3 mu-na-ab-šum2-mu
148.
ĝiš-nu2-da-ni-še3 mu-na-ab-šum2-mu
149.
e-ne ur2-bi ĝišellag-a-ni-še3 ba-da-ab-dim2-e
150.
pa-bi ĝiše-ke4-ma-ni-še3 ba-ab-dim2-e

Gilgameš, Enkidu and the nether world

Version A
1-26. In those days, in those distant days, in those nights, in those remote nights, in those years, in those distant years; in days of yore, when the necessary things had been brought into manifest existence, in days of yore, when the necessary things had been for the first time properly cared for, when bread had been tasted for the first time in the shrines of the Land, when the ovens of the Land had been made to work, when the heavens had been separated from the earth, when the earth had been delimited from the heavens, when the fame of mankind had been established, when An had taken the heavens for himself, when Enlil had taken the earth for himself, when the nether world had been given to Ereškigala as a gift; when he set sail, when he set sail, when the father set sail for the nether world, when Enki set sail for the nether world — against the king a storm of small hailstones arose, against Enki a storm of large hailstones arose. The small ones were light hammers, the large ones were like stones from catapults (?). The keel of Enki’s little boat was trembling as if it were being butted by turtles, the waves at the bow of the boat rose to devour the king like wolves and the waves at the stern of the boat were attacking Enki like a lion.
27-35. At that time, there was a single tree, a single ḫalub tree, a single tree, growing on the bank of the pure Euphrates, being watered by the Euphrates. The force of the south wind uprooted it and stripped its branches, and the Euphrates picked it up and carried it away. A woman, respectful of An’s words, was walking along; a woman, respectful of Enlil’s words, was walking along, and took the tree and brought it into Unug, into Inana’s luxuriant garden.
36-46. The woman planted the tree with her feet, but not with her hands. The woman watered it using her feet but not her hands. She said: “When will this be a luxuriant chair on which I can take a seat?” She said: “When this will be a luxuriant bed on which I can lie down?” Five years, 10 years went by, the tree grew massive; its bark, however, did not split. At its roots, a snake immune to incantations made itself a nest. In its branches, the Anzud bird settled its young. In its trunk, the phantom maid built herself a dwelling, the maid who laughs with a joyful heart. But holy Inana cried!
47-69. When dawn was breaking, when the horizon became bright, when the little birds, at the break of dawn, began to clamour, when Utu had left his bedchamber, his sister holy Inana said to the young warrior Utu: “My brother, in those days when destiny was determined, when abundance overflowed in the Land, when An had taken the heavens for himself, when Enlil had taken the earth for himself, when the nether world had been given to Ereškigala as a gift; when he set sail, when he set sail, when the father set sail for the nether world, when Enki set sail for the nether world — against the lord a storm of small hailstones arose, against Enki a storm of large hailstones arose. The small ones were light hammers, the large ones were like stones from catapults (?). The keel of Enki’s little boat was trembling as if it were being butted by turtles, the waves at the bow of the boat rose to devour the lord like wolves and the waves at the stern of the boat were attacking Enki like a lion.”
70-78. “At that time, there was a single tree, a single ḫalub tree, a single tree (?), growing on the bank of the pure Euphrates, being watered by the Euphrates. The force of the south wind uprooted it and stripped its branches, and the Euphrates picked it up and carried it away. I, a woman, respectful of An’s words, was walking along; I, a woman, respectful of Enlil’s words, was walking along, and took the tree and brought it into Unug, into holy Inana’s luxuriant garden.”
79-90. “I, the woman, planted the tree with my feet, but not with my hands. I, {Inana} {(1 ms. has instead:) the woman}, watered it using my feet but not my hands. She said: “When will this be a luxuriant chair on which I can take a seat?” She said: “When will this be a luxuriant bed on which I can lie down?” Five years, 10 years had gone by, the tree had grown massive; its bark, however, did not split. At its roots, a snake immune to incantations made itself a nest. In its branches, the Anzud bird settled its young. In its trunk, the phantom maid built herself a dwelling, the maid who laughs with a joyful heart. But holy Inana cried!” Her brother, the young warrior Utu, however, did not stand by her in the matter.
91-113. When dawn was breaking, when the horizon became bright, when the little birds, at the break of dawn, began to clamour, when Utu had left his bedchamber, his sister holy Inana said to the warrior Gilgameš: “My brother, in those days when destiny was determined, when abundance overflowed in the Land, when An had taken the heavens for himself, when Enlil had taken the earth for himself, when the nether world had been given to Ereškigala as a gift; when he set sail, when he set sail, when the father set sail for the nether world, when Enki set sail for the nether world — against the lord a storm of small hailstones arose, against Enki a storm of large hailstones arose. The small ones were light hammers, the large ones were like stones from catapults (?). The keel of Enki’s little boat was trembling as if it were being butted by turtles, the waves at the bow of the boat rose to devour the lord like wolves and the waves at the stern of the boat were attacking Enki like a lion.”
114-122. “At that time, there was a single tree, a single ḫalub tree, a single tree (?), growing on the bank of the pure Euphrates, being watered by the Euphrates. The force of the south wind uprooted it and stripped its branches, and the Euphrates picked it up and carried it away. I, a woman, respectful of An’s words, was walking along; I, a woman, respectful of Enlil’s words, was walking along, and took the tree and brought it into Unug, into Inana’s luxuriant garden.”
123-135. “The woman planted the tree with her feet, but not with her hands. Inana watered it using her feet but not her hands. She said: “When will this be a luxuriant chair on which I can take a seat?” She said: “When will this be a luxuriant bed on which I can lie down?” Five years, 10 years had gone by, the tree had grown massive; its bark, however, did not split. At its roots, a snake immune to incantations made itself a nest. In its branches, the Anzud bird settled its young. In its trunk, the phantom maid built herself a dwelling, the maid who laughs with a joyful heart. But {holy Inana} {(1 ms. has instead:) I, holy Inana,} cried!” In the matter which his sister had told him about, her brother, the warrior Gilgameš, stood by her.
136-150. He {strapped} {(1 ms. has instead:) ……} his …… belt of 50 minas weight to his waist — 50 minas were to him as 30 shekels. He took his bronze axe used for expeditions, which weighs seven talents and seven minas, in his hand. He killed the snake immune to incantations living at its roots. The Anzud bird living in its branches took up its young and went into the mountains. The phantom maid living in its trunk left (?) her dwelling and sought refuge in the wilderness. As for the tree, he uprooted it and stripped its branches, and the sons of his city, who went with him, cut up its branches and {bundled them} {(1 ms. has instead:) piled them up}. He gave it to his sister holy Inana for her chair. He gave it to her for her bed. As for himself, from its roots, he manufactured his ball (?) and, from its branches, he manufactured his mallet (?).

Annunci

6 commenti Aggiungi il tuo

  1. teoderica ha detto:

    Ma stiamo lavorando alla Grande. Mi piace molto questo post coi suoi video. Conosco solo un po’ di inglese e francese scolastico ( mi sento handicappata per non sapere le lingue… ma il tempo è tiranno)Volevo solo dirti che col tuo post non ho sentito l’ hadicap, era percepibile anche coi sensi. A pubblicare qualche mio pensiero in lingua ci avevo pensato ( anno scorso con un blogger canadese ci siamo scambiati dei lavori) ma veramente poi il tempo manca. Chapeau!

    Mi piace

  2. teoderica ha detto:

    Ma stiamo lavorando alla Grande. Mi piace molto questo post coi suoi video. Conosco solo un po’ di inglese e francese scolastico ( mi sento handicappata per non sapere le lingue… ma il tempo è tiranno)Volevo solo dirti che col tuo post non ho sentito l’ hadicap, era percepibile anche coi sensi. A pubblicare qualche mio pensiero in lingua ci avevo pensato ( anno scorso con un blogger canadese ci siamo scambiati dei lavori) ma veramente poi il tempo manca. Chapeau!

    Mi piace

  3. pietro d. perrone ha detto:

    Tea, non voglio affatto prendermi meriti che non sono miei. Il testo inglese non è mio. E’ del sito americano dove l’ho trovato. Ma è favoloso no? (vai sui link che allego ai post. Viaggerai anche di più di quanto non sia possibile nello spazio del blog. Mi piace molto cercare su internet, vagare intorno ad un’idea, ad un personaggio, ad una storia. Si trovano cose meravigliose).Ti voglio anche dire un’altra cosa. Mi fa molto piacere quello che hai appena detto, trasmette e percepire con i sensi. Sta diventando un’esperienza nuova e particolare la comunicazione via blog. Molto più di quanto immaginassi all’inizio. Un abbraccio sincero.Piero

    Mi piace

  4. pietro d. perrone ha detto:

    Tea, non voglio affatto prendermi meriti che non sono miei. Il testo inglese non è mio. E’ del sito americano dove l’ho trovato. Ma è favoloso no? (vai sui link che allego ai post. Viaggerai anche di più di quanto non sia possibile nello spazio del blog. Mi piace molto cercare su internet, vagare intorno ad un’idea, ad un personaggio, ad una storia. Si trovano cose meravigliose).Ti voglio anche dire un’altra cosa. Mi fa molto piacere quello che hai appena detto, trasmette e percepire con i sensi. Sta diventando un’esperienza nuova e particolare la comunicazione via blog. Molto più di quanto immaginassi all’inizio. Un abbraccio sincero.Piero

    Mi piace

  5. teoderica ha detto:

    Ma ti chiami Pietro o Piero?

    Mi piace

  6. teoderica ha detto:

    Ma ti chiami Pietro o Piero?

    Mi piace

I COMMENTI SONO GRADITI

Inserisci i tuoi dati qui sotto o clicca su un'icona per effettuare l'accesso:

Logo WordPress.com

Stai commentando usando il tuo account WordPress.com. Chiudi sessione / Modifica )

Foto Twitter

Stai commentando usando il tuo account Twitter. Chiudi sessione / Modifica )

Foto di Facebook

Stai commentando usando il tuo account Facebook. Chiudi sessione / Modifica )

Google+ photo

Stai commentando usando il tuo account Google+. Chiudi sessione / Modifica )

Connessione a %s...